Despite Extractivism: Exhibition and Online Event Series

It’s our pleasure to invite you to our online exhibition and event series exploring the ways in which care, creativity and community persist, exist and resist despite – or because – of extractivism. 

The Despite Extractivism online exhibition (opening on Thursday) assembles expressions of care, creativity and community from diverse sites of extraction and geographical contexts. Collectively, the works in this exhibition illuminate and explore ways of questioning, subverting and resisting the logics and impacts of extractivism. Can artistic interventions help foster new sensibilities and solidarities with distanced extractive contexts? Can the extractive zone be a fertile ground for alternatives?

Accompanying the exhibition, our events series is an unfolding opportunity for collective learning and solidarity-building with artists, activists, academics, communities and active audiences.

Between a launch event (Thursday 20th January, 12-1.30pm UK) and a closing event, three webinars will explore the stories, ideas and practises of the Despite Extractivism contributors and the communities they engage with. The events, featuring performances, presentations and discussions, focus in turn on expanding but intersecting scales, from the body to the global.

Presenters and further information to be announced – please register on eventbrite, stay tuned to the exhibition page and follow us on twitter @Extracting_Us .

Despite Extractivism is the third exhibition organised by the Extracting Us Collective (Siti Maimunah, Dian Ekowati, Alice Owen, Rebecca Elmhirst and Elona Hoover, with technical and curatorial support from Celina Loh). The collective is part of the EU-funded WEGO-ITN network for Feminist Political Ecology research, which has informed our theoretical approach and curatorial principles and practices. We have also worked with and received support from ONCA, a Brighton based arts charity that bridges social and environmental justice issues with creativity, and the research Centre for Spatial, Environmental and Cultural Politics (SECP) based at the University of Brighton.

On behalf of the Extracting Us Collective

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