CALL FOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS – African Geographical Review

Cover image for African Geographical Review

Positions:

  1. Associate Editor—Human Geography
  2. Associate Editor—Physical Geography
  3. Associate Editor—Geospatial

Background to the Journal

The African Geographical Review (AGR) is a leading international peer reviewed journal for geographical scholarship relating to Africa. It publishes the highest quality research in all fields of geography, including human, nature – society, physical and the techniques. The journal publishes several types of articles, including research manuscripts, commentaries, methodological notes, field notes, featured reflections, and book reviews.

The overall aims of the AGR are to enhance the standing of geography of and in Africa, to promote better representation of African scholarship, and to facilitate lively academic conversations regarding the African continent. 

We are proud to highlight that significant number of AGR submissions come from African scholars working globally and Institutions on the African continent.

  1. ROLE

The Associate Editors will work with the Chief Editor on all aspects of the African Geographical Review, a refereed journal published by Taylor & Francis, on behalf of the African Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers. The Associate Editors shall serve a 3-year term, and if interested and available, be re-appointed for a second 3-year term (for a maximum of 6-years). Associate Editors would have the opportunity to apply to become Chief Editor during their first or second term.

S/he must work hard to support the growth of the AGR which provides an excellent outlet for the publication of geographical material relating to Africa; enhancing the standing of African geography, and promoting a better representation of African scholarship. Additionally, s/he must commit themselves to ensuring that the journal maintains its reputation of publishing the best material on African geography scholarship. The Associate Editors work dutifully with the Chief Editor in the selection, editing, and publishing of all journal content.

  1. RELATIONSHIP WITH ASG AND AGR EDITORIAL BOARD

The Editors report to the President of the ASG and regularly update the president on the status of the journal. Taylor & Francis is currently publishing the journal 4 times a year and will remain responsible for the marketing aspects of the journal. The Chief Editor and the Associate Editors will work with the publishers and the Editorial Board to ensure successful production of the AGR.  In particular, the editors will supply Taylor & Francis with manuscripts in a timely manner and work with the ASG Chair to ensure that ASG journal subscribers have timely access to the journal.

  1.   DUTIES
  2. Work in partnership with the Chief Editor, the AGR publishers, the ASG Chair, and the AGR Editorial Board, to define the overall strategic direction for the journal.
  3. Actively solicit manuscripts for journal issues.
  4. Maintain regular communication with the Editorial Board and attend an annual meeting of the Editorial Board to discuss journal review policies and procedures and the general direction of the journal.
  5. Conduct initial screening of all manuscripts and forward those that meet Journal criteria to selected reviewers.
  6. Work with authors to revise manuscripts based on reviewers’ comments and the editors’ recommendations for improvement (e.g., clarity, development of ideas, scholarly accuracy, overall quality, and compliance with publication guidelines). 
  7. Serve along with the Chief Editor as the primary liaison to authors.
  8. Return rejected manuscripts to authors with constructive formal letters.
  9. Coordinate journal production with the Chief Editor to ensure a regular production schedule.
  10. Together with the journal publishers and the Chief Editor, participate in journal promotion and development activities including sponsorships and other appropriate advertising.
  11. Perform other tasks as assigned by the Chief Editor.
  1. QUALIFICATIONS

The Associate Editors of the Journal must possess the following attributes:

  • Excellent communication (oral, written, and editing) skills
  • Be an active member of the AAG (ASG membership is an added advantage)
  • Be a scholar in good academic standing
  • Have excellent interpersonal skills
  • Have creative ideas and approaches to expand the journals reach and diversity

V.   APPLICATION PROCESS:

To apply for this position, please submit:

  • a letter of interest that details your qualifications for the position, the specific position (Human, Physical, or Geospatial) and a visionary statement as the future editor of the journal (2-page max).
  • a current curriculum vitae (5-page max)

The completed application should be received by Friday April 8th, 2022. Please submit electronic copies of your application to the Co-chairs of the Search Committee, Dr. Ben Neimark (b.neimark@lancaster.ac.uk) and Dr. Godwin Arku (garku@uwo.ca).

Arrangements will be made to interview candidates virtually in April/May, 2022. Please contact Dr Ben Neimark if you have any questions.

New Masters (MA) in Political Ecology – Lancaster University

•The only one of its kind in the UK: dedicated to understanding how the environment and politics intersect with issues of power and justice

•You will work with and learn from one of the largest political ecology research groups in the UK

•You will directly engage with both academic and non-academic practitioners of political ecology, including environmental activists and film-makers

•You will take your learning into the ‘real world’ through innovative teaching sessions that move outside the classroom •

Brief Descriptoin:

Interested in challenging the status quo of the environment and its politics?

Come and join us at Lancaster for our recently launched MA in Political Ecology!

We are the only programme of its type in the UK, offering the conceptual tools and practical skills to ask the difficult questions of human-environment relations and drive transformative action. You will be immersed in one of the UK’s largest and dynamic political ecology research groups, which draws upon diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives. These address and analyse critiques, debates and actions related to environmental concerns over local to global scales. Key themes include the politics of resource extraction, water, climate politics and the green economy. We offer novel approaches to our teaching, engaging our students in creative classes that provide tools to understand a complex planet and the challenges of our living with it.  

For more information, please see: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-courses/political-ecology-ma/ or contact John Childs at j.childs@lancaster.ac.uk 

NEW PROJECT WEBSITE: ESRC-FUNDED CONCRETE IMPACTS: A SUPPLY CHAIN AND LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE US MILITARY’S ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT – https://www.concreteimpacts.org/

Project Summary

Concrete Impacts is a UKRI-Economic Social Research Council funded collaboration between Lancaster and Durham Universities examining the socio-ecological effects of military supply chains and wider environmental damage.

At the heart of this research project is ‘geo-political ecology’ – defined as the ‘…synergies between political ecologists’ careful attention to multi-scale environmental politics and the discursive-material co-constitution of global institutional geopolitics.’ (Bigger and Neimark 2018).

Our novel approach uses supply chain analysis – usually reserved as an economic management tool – as a way to measure socio-environmental impact in highly affected population locations or ‘hotspots.’ We will deliver a comprehensive open-sourced datalab that is a user-friendly source for climate, environmental and socio-economic costs of US military procurement of sand, water and cement in a theatre of war.

The purpose of Concrete Impacts is to examine how sand, water & cement were procured and delivered through military supply chains in Iraq and beyond. We do so by developing maps of military supply chains and pinpointing source material hotspots. We will calculate the environmental and pollution footprint of these materials using a novel hybrid Life-Cycle Analysis (LCA).

We arealso co-leading a major initiative to track, analyse and close the military emissions gap, and demand that governments disclose their military emissions data to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Learn more here: militaryemissions.org

Watch a short video about our activities alongside colleagues at the Conflict and Environment Observatory: https://youtu.be/1DesJ4KAqnM

The Research team includes: Benjamin Neimark, Oliver Belcher, Kirsti Ashworth, Reuben Larbi & Patrick Bigger

To find out more: https://www.concreteimpacts.org/

Lecturer in Economic Geography –

Closes:22nd August 2021

Lancaster University – Lancaster Environment Centre

The Lancaster Environment Centre is one of the world’s largest centres for environmental research. Our mission is to perform world-leading research, and to use that research to help understand and respond to global and environmental challenges. We span social- and natural science and work in an interdisciplinary research environment. We wish to appoint a lecturer in Economic Geography who will work within the Critical Geographies or Political Ecology research groups.

We seek an outstanding candidate whose research, engagement and teaching interests are in economic geography as applied critically to areas of environment or climate action and governance. This could include, for example, expertise in the economic or financial dimensions of climate and environment policy, feminist ecological economists, critical perspectives on the political economy/ecology of sustainability transitions, low carbon strategies and practices, the operation of biodiversity and carbon offsets and market-based environmental solutions in water, conservation or other domains, and decolonising perspectives on and approaches to economic geography.  We see economic geography to be an area of the geography discipline currently undergoing much rejuvenation and innovation and are looking for candidates who can contribute substantially to this agenda.  

Applications are invited from early career social scientists from all backgrounds who are building an international reputation for research in the broad area of economic geography. We encourage scholars from backgrounds under-represented in these fields. You will have a clear track record of achievement and publication and a compelling vision for your research. The candidate should be able to demonstrate how they will develop international collaborations that complement or strengthen existing research links in LEC, and internally work with other nodes of excellence in the University, including the Pentland Centre for Sustainability in Business based in the Management School. You will have a strong commitment to the teaching of human geography. At undergraduate level, you will support delivery of the degree programmes BA/BSc Geography which contain core teaching in economic geography. For our postgraduate taught portfolio, you will contribute to teaching as part of our new MA in Political Ecology.

LEC offers a highly collegial and stimulating environment for career development based on departmental values and embedded Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity (EDI) considerations and actions. We are committed to family-friendly and flexible working policies on an individual basis as well as the Athena SWAN Charter, which recognises and celebrates good employment practice undertaken to address gender equality in higher education and research. Furthermore, we are active and progressive around sustainability, wellbeing and decolonising agendas.

Informal enquiries can be addressed to Professor Nigel Clark, n.clark2@lancaster.ac.uk, Professor Frances Cleaver, f.cleaver@lancaster.ac.uk or Director Professor Phil Barker, p.barker@lancaster.ac.uk .

We welcome applications from people in all diversity groups.

New Two-year Postdoc Opportunity: Military Supply Chains & Environmental Footprints

https://images.theconversation.com/files/280914/original/file-20190624-97789-11t31n3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&rect=0%2C413%2C3000%2C1500&q=45&auto=format&w=1356&h=668&fit=crop
US Air Force fighters during the 1991 Gulf War. Everett Historical/Shutterstock

We welcome applications for a Research Associate to join this new initiative funded by the Economic Social Research Council Secondary Data Analysis Initiative investigating military environmental footprints, led by Benjamin Neimark, Kirsti Ashworth, Patrick Bigger and Oliver Belcher.

The initiative is a partnership between Lancaster University, and the Lancaster Environment Centre (LEC), and in collaboration with the Data Science Institute, and the Institute for Social Futures and Durham University, School of Government and International Affairs. The postholder will join a lively, interdisciplinary department, Lancaster Environment Centre, with a strong tradition of quality research and impact with government, activists and business.

While the casualties and humanitarian costs of war are well-reported, wider socio-economic and in particular environmental impacts are generally overlooked. For instance, if the US military were a country, its fuel usage alone would put it in the top 50 largest emittersof greenhouse gases in the world. Yet they, like other global militaries, are entirely unaccountable. You will develop an open source virtual data laboratory to consolidate and make accessible data around the carbon and pollution impacts of military supply chains from a wide range of sources, bringing transparency to this currently opaque issue.

You will have a PhD in a relevant field (or equivalent experience in a relevant research-intensive role), and experience in economic and political geography, climate or energy policy and governance, geographic information systems, acquisition and managing large datasets and/or deliberative research. This experience could have been gained in an academic or other context. You will have strong skills in collaborating with external stakeholders, as well as managing your own time and contributing to the project team.

You will join us on an indefinite contract however, the role remains contingent on external funding which, at this time is due to come to an end on 30th August 2023.

You are encouraged to contact Ben Neimark (b.neimark@lancaster.ac.uk) before applying, to discuss the role in more detail. 

HOW TO APPLY: https://hr-jobs.lancs.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=A3406

Check out a recent new article in DW: Scorched earth: The climate impact of conflict https://www.dw.com/en/the-bootprint-of-war-carbon-emissions/a-57682807

We encourage applications from people in all diversity groups, and with expertise beyond the academic. Applicants will be assessed within the context of your previous study/work environments by, for example, the research facilities available to you, and whether you had opportunities to attend conferences/scientific meetings and develop transferable skills. Applications from those seeking flexible working patterns or jobsharing or wishing to return after a career break are welcome. LEC offers a highly collegial and stimulating environment for career development based on departmental values and embedded Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity (EDI) considerations and actions. We are committed to family-friendly and flexible working policies on an individual basis as well as the Athena SWAN Charter, which recognises and celebrates good employment practice undertaken to address gender equality in higher education and research. Furthermore, we are active and progressive around sustainability, wellbeing and decolonising agendas.

Book launch: Coal, Colonialism & Resistance (by Still Burning – network against hard coal and neocolonialism)

Book launch: Coal, Colonialism & Resistance (by Still Burning – network against hard coal and neocolonialism)

Coal is colonial, coal destroys ecosystems and communities, and coal is a climate killer. Across Europe, governments are implementing coal phase-outs and closing down hard coal mines. At the same time, Europe continues to import hard coal, outsourcing the destruction of ecosystems and communities to Russia, Colombia, and elsewhere. The book highlights the colonial entanglements of coal and warns of false green solutions – relying on hydrogen for ‘green steel’, for instance, and on renewables for ‘clean electricity’ – that don’t challenge colonialism, capitalism, and the state. It centres the voices of affected communities and warns of ‘false green solutions’.

After a short presentation of the book, we invite two speakers from Russia and Colombia to share their experiences of the impacts of mining and their resistance, and a decolonial climate justice and degrowth activist to explore ‘false solutions’ and ways to challenge climate injustice and neocolonialism.

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30 March, 2021, 6-7.45pm CEST/5-6.45pm GMT

Speakers include:

Narlis Guzmán Angula (Environmental and human rights activist, Colombia, via video message)
Vladimir Slivyak
(EcoDefence, Russia)
Tonny Nowshin (Climate justice and degrowth activist)
Co-author of Coal, Colonialism & Resistance

Language: English

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/still-burning-coal-colonialism-resistance-book-launch-tickets-144389088651

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Follow-up event: Coal and resistance in Colombia – a critical perspective of a local activist after a year of pandemic

April 7, 2021 7–8.30pm CEST/6-7.30pm GMT

Speaker:

Narlis Guzmán Angulo (environmental and human rights activist)

Languages: Spanish/English

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The book will be available here from 30 March on https://stillburning.net/ in pdf and printed version

We are looking forward to welcoming many of you there!

The editors of the book

#stillburning

Two, 3-year Research Scientist postdoctoral positions in Maritime Geographies/Social Sciences at the Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity (HIFMB), Oldenburg, Germany.

Two, 3-year Research Scientist postdoctoral positions in Maritime Geographies/Social Sciences at the Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity (HIFMB), Oldenburg, Germany. Come and join a growing group of geographers and social scientists at the interdisciplinary Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity (HIFMB). Located in beautiful Oldenburg, Germany, the HIFMB – a collaboration between the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) and Carl von Ossietzky University (UOL) – offers a multi-disciplinary, international, and dynamic environment for researching the marine environment and a vibrant, friendly and supportive culture for postdoctoral staff. 
Within the HIFMB, expertise in marine ecology, data science and biodiversity theory are joined with a ever-growing social science and humanities profile in political ecology, maritime geographies and marine governance. The Carl von Ossietzky University is home to the Institute for Social Science, which has strong ties to the HIFMB.  It is also an established home to work in Marine Spatial Planning.                                                                 

 We invite applications for 2 postdoctoral Research Scientist positions: Research Scientist Position: “Follow the enforcement: Spatialising understandings of monitoring, reporting and sanctioning at sea”(m/f/d)within the Marine Governance Group with Kimberley Petershttps://recruitingapp-5442.de.umantis.com/Vacancies/770/Description/2

Research Scientist Position: “Maritime motorways, global ship routeing and the governance of marine biodiversity” (m/f/d) within the Marine Governance Group with Kimberley Petershttps://recruitingapp-5442.de.umantis.com/Vacancies/769/Description/2

Both roles are paid in accordance with the Collective Agreement for the Public Service of the Federation (Tarifvertrag des öffentlichen Dienstes, TVöD Bund), up to salary level 13 (known as E13). 

These are posted with the appreciation and knowledge that time-limited jobs are far from perfect, but also the hope that 3-year positions and ones that note candidates will be supported in career progression are a step in the right direction. Do get in touch if you have any questions.
 As a reminder, we also offer 4 fully funded PhD positions in projects as diverse as benthic geopolitics to emotional marine governance. Details of all posts are here: https://hifmb.de/news/jobs/
Applications for the postdoctoral positions are due by April 4th 2021 exclusively online. Applications should consist of a cover letter (max.2 pages) outlining the motivations for applying and relevant experience and knowledge, alongside a CV. Further details on the application procedure are available once you click ‘apply’. 

New resources to teach and learn about the political ecology of urban waste management

Original post by Henrik Ernstson of http://situatedupe.net/tlr/

We are proud to present NEW RESOURCES from our #SituatedUPE Collective to teach & learn about the political ecology of urban waste management. We recently finalised our Turning Livelihoods to Waste?-project (TLR) and created this page with outputs: http://situatedupe.net/tlr

Read more

Geopolitical Ecologies of Violence and Resistance

Call for Proposals: POLLEN20

Call for participants
Third Biennial Conference of the Political Ecology Network (POLLEN20)
Contested Natures: Power, Possibility, Prefiguration
Brighton, United Kingdom
24-26 June 2020

Session organizers: Benjamin Neimark b.neimark@lancaster.ac.uk & Patrick Bigger, Lancaster University, p.bigger@lancaster.ac.uk; Oliver Belcher, Durham University, oliver.belcher@durham.ac.uk; and Andrea Brock, University of Sussex, A.Brock@sussex.ac.uk

In early October 2019, hundreds of frontline fossil fuel protesters took direct action against hard coal infrastructure across Germany. Under the banner of #deCOALonize, they blockaded railways, ports and utility companies, demanding an end to ‘coal colonialism’ and an immediate phase-out of coal combustion. The state response was predictable: physical violence by police officers, harsh policing and holding protesters for days in custody following nonviolent action. Still making the rounds in the same media cycle was the story of drone strikes targeting the Aramco oil facility in Saudi Aribia, knocking out 50 percent the Saudi’s capacity and 5 percent of global supply. While we generally understand the casual links between fossil fuels and geopolitics, less studied are the direct and indirect geopolitical entanglements of fossil fuel violence – violence against those resisting them, and the inherent violence to humans and ecosystems.

In this session, we look to these events and others as a way to bring together scholars’ understandings of violence, resistance and critical geopolitics of, and through, nature. Beyond direct violence, we also include more entrenched/indirect forms, such as criminalisation, stigmatisation and framings as domestic extremist or eco-terrorism and allowing for looking at more bureaucratic forms of violence, and everyday policing (by non-police – e.g. welfare state, teachers).

We hope to expand on work in geopolitical ecology and other similar frameworks to explore new considerations of contemporary violence and resistance – the role of institutional, state and non-state actors in violent encounters over planetary futures. We also hope to open up our geographic focus of fossil fuels to violence surrounding different forms of energy lock-ins and carbon-based infrastructures and discourses, including alternative energy and financial schemes around carbon trading and exchange. We are also interested in new forms of resistance to fossil-fuelled institutional violence – from digital (e.g., guerrilla archiving, hacktivists) to grassroots student strikes– are now being used to contest against such violence. In doing this, we aim to grapple with the complex picture of what successful resistance might look like. How can diverse coalitions be formed between environmentalists and anti-imperialism activists? How are environmentalists confronting militarism? How are anti-war activists confronting climate change? What political formations can be forged to facilitate a climatically changed future that is just, liveable, and sustainable? How do we envision a world of less violence – environmental and imperial?

Papers in any form may address a broad number of topics related to geopolitical ecologies of violence and resistance, including but not limited to:  

  • Pipelines and pumps
  • Theoretical, empirical, and/or methodological interventions that critically (re)assess the nature-state relationship regarding violence
  • Frontline and back-end resistance, from ‘tree-huggers’ to eco-hacktivists
  • Resistance to eco-state restructuring under multiple ‘Green New Dealings’
  • Paramilitarities and ‘ramping up’ by non-states
  • Climate change adaptation/mitigation, statecraft, and security
  • New hegemonies of ‘green’ political-economic power
  • ‘Green’ developmentalism and violent dispossession
  • War/violence and biodiversity/resource conservation
  • Settler-colonial environmentalisms
  • Financing violence through MDBs or transnational banks
  • Links between ‘slow’ and ‘fast’ violence

Please send abstract of 250 words or less to Ben Neimark, b.neimark@lancaster.ac.uk by November 4th 2019.