Oops! These two vacancies accidentally didn´t make it to the last newsletter:

Phd & Post-doc position at Lund University´s Centre for Sustainability Studies:

We are looking for candidates to work with us on an exciting project on glaciers and human-nature relations. We have a  fully-funded PhD position and a postdoc position in Sustainability Science at LUCSUS/Lund University for the research project entitled NATURICE- Exploring plural values of human-nature relationships in glacierized environments.  Project’s main objective is to assess and examine how values and human-nature relationships are affected by climate related challenges through a trans-regional study of glaciers in Scandinavia and the Himalayas. Positions are funded by Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development (FORMAS) and will be supervised by Principal Investigator Dr. Mine Islar, Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS) in collaboration with Dr. Anna Sinisalo (GRID-Arendal), Prof. Erik Gomez-Baggethun (The Norwegian Institute for Nature Research-NINA) and Dr.Emma Li Johansson (LUCSUS).

Deadline: 1st of march, 2023

December 2022 & January 2023 Updates

Dear POLLEN Members and Friends, 

We wish you a 2023 full of joy. Let´s keep spreading the word and the work of political ecologists.

Has your POLLEN node NOT been introduced by us? If your node is keen to share your work in upcoming newsletters, please write to us at 

politicalecologynetwork@gmail.com

We also welcome proposals for blog posts on the POLLEN blog – please contact us at the same email address with any ideas! 

We are pleased to post the latest publications, CfPs and more from our lively community. 

With best regards from your POLLEN Secretariat 

Torsten Krause, Juan Samper, Mine Islar and Wim Carton 

IMPORTANT! To get the best view of this newsletter, please enable the media content at the top of the e-mail. 

Publications

Journal articles 

  1. Carton, W. Hougaard, I. Markusson, N. & Lund, JF. (2023) Is carbon removal delaying emission reductions? doi.org/10.1002/wcc.826 
  1. Debates in Post-development & Degrowth Vol. 2: https://politicalecologynetwork.files.wordpress.com/2023/01/04853-degrowthvolume2.pdf  
  1. Dunlap A and Riquito M. 2023. Social warfare for lithium extraction? Open-pit lithium mining, counterinsurgency tactics and enforcing green extractivism in northern Portugal. Energy Research & Social Science 95(1): 1-21. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214629622004157  
  1. Iddrisu AY, Ouma S and Yaro JA (2022) When agricultural commercialization fails: ‘Re-visiting’ value-chain agriculture and its ruins in northern Ghana. Globalizations: 1–21. 
  1. Marks, D. 2023. Unequal and unjust: The political ecology of Bangkok’s increasing urban heat island” and the link to it is here: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/00420980221140999
  1. Loureiro, M., et al. (2023) Governance Diaries: An Approach to Researching Marginalized People’s Lived Experiences in Difficult Settings. https://doi.org/10.1177/16094069221150106 
  1. Rita Calvário & Annette Aurélie Desmarais (2023) The feminist dimensions of food sovereignty: insights from La Via Campesina’s politics, The Journal of Peasant Studies, DOI: 10.1080/03066150.2022.2153042 
  1. Special issue: Introduction on infrastructural harm, providing a nice overview of infrastructural research, revealing gaps, raising questions and outlining the contributors: 
    Kallianos Y, Dunlap A and Dalakoglou D. 2022. Introducing Infrastructural Harm: Rethinking moral entanglements, spatio-temporal modalities, and resistance(s). Globalizations: 1-20. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14747731.2022.2153493 
  1. Special Issue on Territory and decolonisation: debates from the Global Souths: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rtwt20/6/4-6  
  1. Sullivan, S. and Ganuses, W.S. 2022 !Nara harvesters of the northern Namib: a cultural history through three photographed encounters. Journal of the Namibian Scientific Society 69: 115-139, Special Issue “Gobabeb@60” 

Books & book chapters 

  1. Stacey, Paul. (2023) Global Power and Local Struggles in Developing Countries. https://brill.com/display/title/60893  
  1. Sutherland, William (2022) Transforming conservation: A practical guide to evidence and decision-making. https://www.openbookpublishers.com/books/10.11647/obp.0321 Open access. 

Events & Announcements 

  1. A message from the newly formed Enviornmental Justice Studies mailinglist: 
    Dear colleagues, 
    Following recurring discussions with several of you over the years, I am excited to announce the launch of EJList, a mailing list specifically devoted to the field of environmental justice studies. EJList is meant to become the go-to international email discussion group promoting the development and dissemination of environmental and climate justice research and scholarship – something which was long overdue in the field! 
    The list may be used for the discussion of any topic related to environmental justice and climate justice activism, regulation, and research, including (but not limited to) reports on research and publications; calls for papers and proposals; notices of meetings, conferences, reading groups; job announcements; etc.  
    If, like me, you are interested in staying up to date with the latest developments in the field and/or in easily reaching out to the environmental justice research community, join the list by clicking on the Subscribe link from the list webpage. 
    The list is open to everyone, even though the target audience is environmental/climate justice scholars. It is hosted by UCLouvain in Belgium and uses the mailing list service Sympa, a free and open-source software. 
    Please also do forward this announcement to your own environmental justice colleagues, students, and networks; the more the merrier.  
    All the best,  
    Brendan C.  
    EJList” 
  1. Climate Change and the Politics of Land 
    Online seminar by Prof. Saturnino “June” M. Borras, Jr., Fellow at the Transnational Institute 
    11 January 2023, 18:00-19:30 (GMT+9) 
    Registration link: https://www.kasasustainability.org/environmental-change-workshop  
    Organized by KASA Sustainability, and supported by the Sophia University Graduate Program of Global Studies, and the Institute of Comparative Culture. 
    For any concerns, please contact we@kasasustainability.org
  1. Workshop 4 Water Ethics (W4W), the Swiss Chinese Law Association (SCLA) and Globethics.net are hosting this International Conference on Water Management and Water Ethics in the Chinese context, in celebration of the recent publication of the Chinese translation of Blue Ethics: Ethical Perspectives on Sustainable, Fair Water Resources Use and Management and Water Ethics: Principles and Guidelines on 07 December 2022,11:00-12:50 CET(Click Here to Register
  1. PhD Course – Political Ecology of Land and Food Systems 
    When: 30 May-02 June 2023 
    Where: Bergen, Norway 
    Organizers: Department of Geography, University of Bergen + several Norwegian POLLEN nodes 
    Keynotes: Michael Watts and Nancy Peluso (UC Berkeley) 
    Course website: https://www.uib.no/en/course/GEO903 
    Registration form: https://skjemaker.app.uib.no/view.php?id=13951063 
    Application deadline: 01 March 2023 
  1. Environmental justice and violence: Resistances, articulations, and intersections 
    When: 4-6 October 2023 
    Where: San Cristobal de las Casas, Mexico 
    More info: https://enjust.net/conference-mexico-2023/  

Vacancies 

  1. Phd Position at Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies: 
    The successful candidate will work within the 4-year research project entitled “Environmental Human Rights Defenders – Change Agents at the Crossroads of Climate change, Biodiversity and Cultural Conservation”, funded by the Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development (FORMAS). In a collaborative and ambitious research environment, participating researchers will collaborate to produce high level and cutting-edge research at the nexus of academia, society and policy. 
    Environmental human rights defenders (EHRD) are increasingly being recognized as pivotal actors in transformations towards sustainability, biodiversity protection and climate action. In addition, EHRD often defend the rights of indigenous peoples, local communities and other marginalized groups.  However, they may also be facing intimidation and violence for their efforts. Rarely are the struggles for political, cultural, social, economic and environmental rights made visible in international policy arenas. In this inter-disciplinary project, we seek to investigate how and to what extent are EHRD confronting these challenges, and acting as agents of change for cultural and biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation and adaptation. 
    Deadline: 16 of feb 2023 
    More info: https://lu.varbi.com/en/what:job/jobID:577514/  
  1. Adjunct Professor Environmental Studies at Dickinson College 
    Candidates should submit the following via QUEST (online application system) at https://jobs.dickinson.edu: Letter of interest; Contact details for two references (at least one speaking to teaching ability); Teaching statement that references the candidate’s teaching philosophy, experience and ability to teach an upper level course in their area of expertise; Current CV. Review of applications will begin on January 15, 2023 and continue until the position is filled. 
  1. The Department of Geographical Sciences at University of Maryland, College Park, is seeking a Post-Doctoral Associate in Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change. This position will be part of a large multi-year international research project, “Operation Pangolin: Unifying Diverse Data Streams to Redefine Species Conservation,” including other conservation criminology-related research as well as new research proposed by the applicant.  
    Position open until filled. 
    More info: https://ejobs.umd.edu/postings/101049  
  1. Project Researcher in Urban Governance (Södertörn University, Sweden) 
    We are looking for a motivated and qualified researcher to join our project team and collaborate on the development and delivery of project outcomes targeting practitioners, planners, and policymakers in the frame of contemporary aims and ambitions for more participatory and inclusive urban governance.  
    The School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies of Södertörn University is located at Flemingsberg Campus, Stockholm Region. We offer an international, collaborative, and highly interdisciplinary working environment. Our ambition is to recruit a talented researcher who has a strong interest in social and environmental justice and equity, the positioning of less-represented groups in relation to contemporary urban challenges. 
    Deadline: 24 Feb 2023 
    Please see the call text here: https://www.sh.se/english/sodertorn-university/meet-sodertorn-university/this-is-sodertorn-university/vacant-positions?rmpage=job&rmjob=6236&rmlang=UK 

Calls 

  1. Call for contributions: 
    Review of African Political Economy special issue, titled ‘The climate emergency in Africa: crisis, solutions and resistance’ 
    Themes: Extraction and the exploitation of fossil fuels // War, repression and climate change // Renewable energy sources and labour // Climate disaster in Africa and its impacts // Solutions 
    More info: https://roape.net/2022/10/06/roape-special-issue-call-for-contributors-the-climate-emergency-in-africa-crisis-solutions-and-resistance/ 
  1. Call for Abstracts:  
    International Conference “Sustainable Food and Biomass Futures. Localised approaches to agricultural change and bioeconomy”, June 22-24, 2023, Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development, Germany 
    More info here: https://www.transect.de/call-for-papers-international-conference-on-sustainable-food-and-biomass-futures 
  1. Call for Papers: On Relationalities: Politics, Narrative, Sociality 
    The theme of relationality is now centre stage in contemporary political and social thought. From relational ontology to post-foundational ethics and black feminisms, relationality has far-reaching implications for debates in politics, ethics, and aesthetics. For this symposium we invite engagements with, revisions of, and challenges to relationality as well as interventions about its role in the humanities and arts today. Relationality is a transdisciplinary topic that questions the academy, and compels us to rethink the conventions of an event like this. Our institutional and disciplinary practices normalise a certain politics of relationality while foreclosing others. For that reason, we are particularly open to interdisciplinary contributions from across the humanities, social sciences, and beyond. Colleagues working in (but not limited to) sociology, gender studies, history, black studies, queer theory, literary studies, politics, decolonial studies, cultural geography, disability studies, visual cultures, anthropology, neurodiversity studies, indigenous thought, environmental studies, and philosophy are invited to participate. 
  1. Call for Proposals for a Special Issue on Political Ecology by the Ecology, Economy and Society – The INSEE Journal 
    One of the relatively new academic traditions to emerge in the 1980s, political ecology has emerged in recent decades as a powerful analytical tool to explain how capitalist development processes affect the environment, how international conservation organizations influence national governments, and how environmental changes threaten local livelihoods. Political ecology, as an interdisciplinary field, often brings together political economy and cultural ecology, with an emphasis on multi-scalar analysis that elucidates linkages between local/everyday events and regional/national/global/planetary processes.  It illuminates ‘the political’ in ecological questions through the examination of power relationships and elucidation of forms of power, cross-scale links in political processes in view of which environmental decisions are made by communities, and the dynamics of the market and priorities of the nations.  
    EES is proposing a special issue on Political Ecology for Volume 6(2), to be published in July 2023. We are inviting: 
    Original research papers – not exceeding 8000 words; and 
    Insights from the field – not exceeding 2000 words 
    Detailed submission guidelines are available on the journal website. 
  1. CfP ECAS – Disrupting “modernity” – Towards alternative bioeconomic futures in Africa – deadline Jan 23rd. 
    Organizers: Leiyo Singo (University of Bayreuth), Dr. Richard Mbunda (University of Dar es Salaam) 
    This panel discusses alternatives to the mainstream bioeconomy narrative. Its core idea — an economy that respects environmental limits and provides enough resources for a fulfilling life — contains space for a plurality of interpretations, which we seek to showcase with a view from Africa. 
    Long Abstract: 
    The policy field of “bioeconomy” has emerged in the Global North as an attempt to unify the goals of climate change mitigation and sustaining economic growth. It envisions an economy that deploys only renewable resources. Although policies based on it have been directed at economies of the Global North, it is obvious that a transformation of the resource base from fossils to renewables will have tremendous impacts on economies of the Global South, including land-rich economies in Africa.  
    Scholars and activists from the Degrowth movement in the Global North have been criticizing the ethical and epistemic presuppositions of the mainstream bioeconomy narrative and its underlying notions of modernity and progress. However, the voices of African stakeholders remain scarce. 
    This panel intends to present views from Africa on alternatives to the mainstream bioeconomy narrative. Its core idea — an economy that respects environmental limits and provides enough resources for a fulfilling life — contains space for a plurality of interpretations for which we use the notion “bio_economy”. The goal of the panel is to identify and discuss African variants of this plurality. 
    Particularly, we invite contributions that present voices from members of social groups in Africa which find themselves at the margins of public or political debates about their conceptions of desirable land-use, agriculture, or other areas relevant for a bioeconomy; their attitudes to agricultural technologies, GMOs, notions of productivity; their conceptions of a fulfilling life; strategies for politicization of marginalized visions of land-use, agriculture, pastoralism etc. 
    Submit an abstract: https://ecasconference.org/2023/programme#12589 
  1. CfP: The Great Convergence? Agricultural Modernization and its Others in Global Perspective 
    With this panel, we want to discuss focal points for convergence as well as divergence among discourses on agricultural modernization (and its others) and how they shape local realities. In how far do the politically dominating narratives of agricultural modernity in different parts of the world converge despite their apparent differences? How do these narratives manifest in agrarian policies, practices, and imaginaries? Where do these ideas originate from, and how do they shape realities on the ground? And finally, what other visions of agriculture exist, where do they originate from, and in what might they converge globally, too? 
    More info: https://dkg2023.de/sitzungen/the-great-convergence-agricultural-modernization-81592 
     

Other news items 

Beating, kicking, tearing down houses – how police, RWE, and the German state are causing climate catastrophe in the German Rhineland

Lützerath has become a battlefield, where police forces defend fossil capital at all costs, enforcing climate catastrophe and destroying habitats.

By: Andrea Brock

Photograph by UNWISEMONKEYS

The eviction of Lützerath, the last village to be destroyed by coal mine operator RWE to get to the thick layer of lignite coal underneath, is officially over – all protesters evicted, trees houses torn down. Pinky and Brain, the two tunnellers who blockaded a tunnel underneath the village, left voluntarily, after spending several days underground.

But while the village might have been lost, the fight continues. The last week has seen protesters block coal train tracks, occupy excavators and electricity infrastructures, burn down police vehicles, shut down offices and roads, and sabotage machinery. Solidarity action with Lützerath prisoners included the burning of Amazon cars in Berlin, the blockade of the German embassy in Poland, and ‘subvertising’ (fake advertising) actions across Germany. On Saturday, protesters locked themselves onto RWE’s entrance gate in Essen, and hundreds walked through neighbouring villages. As police continue to protect fossil capital, facilitating RWE’s operations and enforcing ecological destruction, people continue to fight back.

The eviction started on 10 January, ‘Day X’. Brought in from 14 German states, almost 4000 police officers evicted people from occupied tree houses and ropeways, monopods and tripods, farm houses and other structures. Several hundred people were resisting the eviction by climbing up trees and barricading themselves in occupied buildings, locking on and gluing on. They hung on ropeways in wind and rain, as safety ropes were cut and trees were felled, falling over just meters away. At least one protester dropped several meters, I am told, left hanging upside down following actions by the police height intervention team and had to be transported away by paramedics. Elsewhere, people fought back, through sabotage and arson attacks on RWE coal trains.

On Saturday the 14th of January, 35,000 people joined a demonstration near the village, many making their way through the mud fields to get to Lützerath and the edge of the mine. Countless protesters broke through police lines and forced police to retreat, some entered the opencast mine.

The eviction was shaped by police brutality and violence. When they realised that they were unable to stop thousands of protesters during the mass demonstration, police beat up people with batons and pepper spray, kicking and pushing them to the ground. In small gangs, they charged into groups of protesters. Police dogs attacked activists, just meters away from the steep edge of the Garweiler II opencast coal mine, and used water cannons and horses. They dragged people by their hair, and used pressure points to cause pain and intimidation.

Photograph by Barbara Schnell

Between 100 and 200 protesters were injured – exact numbers are difficult to get, because reporting injuries would require identification and thus risk further police repression. Dozens of people had head injuries, many had broken bones and one person had to be transported away by helicopter. “I’ve seen every bone in the human body broken today”, an action medic tweets afterwards.

Since 2017, police officers in North Rhine Westphalia are no longer required to wear identification numbers, one of the first official acts of the current minister of the Interior, Reul, and his party.

So even if the political will to hold officers accountable existed, it would be unlikely it would yield results.

Reul is known for his support of RWE and repressive policing, having previously caught lying about meeting with RWE bosses, and being responsible for the illegal eviction of the neighbouring Hambacher forest occupation (see below).

Despite numerous videos of police violence, Reul maintains that police conduct was ‘professional’, framing protesters as radicals, extremists, and violent criminals. Major media reproduce this narrative to delegitimize resistance.

Resisting divide-and-conquer attempts

For years, RWE, police, and politicians have tried to divide-and-conquer the Rhinish anti-coal movement, asking groups to distance themselves from more ‘radical’ elements of the resistance, but this time, it was unsuccessful. Despite its diversity – eco-anarchists and liberal environmentalists, Fridays-for-future kids and church groups, students and grandparents – and despite political pressure, there has been no “distancing” from actions and forms of protest over the past week, as so often occurs. No condemnation, no appeals for ‘nonviolence’ or ‘peaceful protest’. People have embraced a diversity of tactics, not letting the state and RWE divide and rule.

The resistance in and around Lützerath is the product of many years of organising. For two and a half years people had prepared for ‘Day X’ – built camps, barricades, tree houses, and tripods, and occupied houses to stop the destruction of the village. They rebuilt community in an area that had long been politically neglected, inhabitants intimidated and paid off, slowly cut off from infrastructures.

The Lützerath camp became a space to share and live together, lough and enjoy, mourn and cry. To take action against RWE, from digger occupations to sabotage. A space that tries to exist outside of capitalism and state structures, anti-colonial and anti-patriarchy, organised non-hierarchically and fostering solidarity and mutual aid.

A history of combative resistance

The Rhinish coal mines have been resisted for many decades. Local groups were fighting back against RWE as early as the seventies. For over 10 years, the Hambacher Forest occupation resisted (and eventually stopped) the destruction of the ancient forest and the expansion of the neighbouring Hambach coal mine – building tree houses, tunnels, walkways, and blockades, occupying diggers, burning police cars and electrical infrastructures, and sabotaging machinery.

Forest defenders have always had to defend themselves from violence of police and security services that regularly attack them – cutting safety ropes, pepper spaying toilet seats, beating up protesters.

Following a meeting between RWE and NRW Interior Minister Reul, the forest occupation was last evicted in 2018, in an intervention that took weeks and thousands of police officers from across Germany, and was stopped by the courts and later declared illegal. The official justification? Fire safety – the lack of fire escapes and access roads for emergency vehicles. A flimsy excuse that was made up to have a reason to evict and facilitate RWE’ cutting operations , as secret recordings of North Rhine Westphalian minister president Laschet have shown.

The 12,000 year old forest is now safe – thanks to years of resistance by forest defenders and citizen groups, numerous evictions and re-occupations, legal challenges and creative actions, arson and sabotage. However, as RWE continues to lower groundwater levels – the mine is up to 450m deep – and dig away soil at the edges of the forest, exacerbated climate change, the forest is slowly drying out.

The forest occupation, just like Lützerath, has always been not just about stopping a coal mine, but about alternative ways of living and organising together, about solidarity and mutual aid, about anarchist values and practices – a world without coal, police, prisons, and borders, a fight against colonialism, capitalism, patriarchy, and the state.

It inspired forest occupations all across Germany and beyond, from #Dannibleibt, the occupation to protect the Dannenröder Forest from road building, to #Fecherlebt, a forest occupation near Frankfurt that was evicted just days ago. But Hambacher Forest defenders have actively supported other struggles too – including the Pont Valley campaign in the North of England in 2018. When plans for a new opencast coal mine led to the growth of the resistance movement, Hambi defenders helped set up a camp to occupy the land, living in tents through months of snow and ice. Solidarity is part and parcel of combative resistance.

Lützerath

Lützerath is the latest of dozens of villages that have been evicted for lignite coal in the German Rhineland, tens of thousands of inhabitants have been expelled and dispossessed over the past century. Old Nazi legislation elevated the extraction of lignite coal for electricity generation to ‘strategic military status’ in 1935, to strengthen wartime capabilities and enable the eviction of entire communities for coal excavation. Today, German police continue to facilitate these evictions.

Photograph by Barbara Schnell

Financed by Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, and HSBC Bank, among others, RWE are planning to extract a further 280 million tonnes of coal for electricity generation.

Some say that the struggle has become a symbolic fight, a fight about the power of the anti-coal movement, and the green credentials of the government. But according to environmental defenders and researchers, it’s more than that. To keep the German pledge to a 1.5 degree target, this coal cannot be burnt, a study by the DIW Berlin has shown.

The coal is not actually necessary for Germany’s energy supply, according to studies, even in case of a gas shortage, as the DIW states. It is part of a deal between RWE and the Green-Conservative coalition government which brings forward the end date of lignite coal mining in Germany from 2038 to 2030, allegedly “saving” five remaining villages that were meant to be evicted under earlier coal mine expansion plans, but sacrificing Lützerath. But modelling by Aurora Energy Research showed that by reconnecting two generating units and increasing annual extraction, the amount of total coal burnt is hardly reduced at all.

By agreeing to this deal, the German Greens have ‘sold out’, according to many protesters. Some believe that this was always RWE’s goal – to split the climate movement from the Green party. For many, it was a wake-up call – they have realised that no governing party will stand up to RWE or take meaningful climate action. It’s people power, they argue, that will make the difference.

RWE in the Rhineland – power and politics

‘Unrivalled and barely manageable, RWE is ruling over one of the largest monopolies of the Western world’ (Spiegel, 1979)

RWE’s interests have always been closely entangled with the state’s interests in the Rhineland, indirectly subsidised and politically supported. Few corporations in Germany are as powerful as RWE.

Photograph by UNWISEMONKEYS

Politicians from all parties – from mayors to parliamentarians and Members of the European Parliament – have been on RWE’s payroll. Revolving door relationships have lubricated the political manoeuvring to defend coal at all costs. Just recently, the office manager of Germany’s minister for foreign affairs and leader of the Green Party has become an RWE lobbyist. In 2015, it emerged that the district administrator responsible for policing anti-coal protest at the time was himself a paid member of RWE’s board of directors.

RWE’s PR and CSR work, including the nature restoration work, and the support by regional media led to the image as good neighbour and ‘responsible corporate citizen’ among parts of the public. Police have long collaborated with RWE on the ground, retweeting RWE press messages, using their vehicles to transport protesters, and communicating closely.

Paying out communities in shares, not taxes, decades ago has meant that many communities and cities are financially dependent on RWE’s financial wellbeing. 25% of RWE’s shares are owned by communities and cities. That means local authorities are shareholders, licensers, clients, constituencies, employees, and tax collectors at the same time. Through payments for attending advisory councils and supervisory boards, politicians have lucrative side incomes.

RWE representatives can be found everywhere – in church choirs and town councils, school board and universities. The company has financed police barbeques and fire trucks, sponsored football clubs and festivals, concerts and exhibitions, viewing platforms and historic castles. They put up baking carts and public book shelfs, have paid for school buildings, organised volunteering activities and tours through the mine. They have gone into school and hand out lunch boxes to first graders, offering school trips into power stations, zoo schools, and environmental education initiatives.

Their teaching materials, role-playing games, and girls’ days in their training centres all reinforce narratives of the inalienability of coal for German energy security, painting picture of blackout and doom, and emphasising RWE’s research into alleged solutions, including carbon capture and storage, that have yet to materialise.

Decades of lobbying, misinformation campaigns, and repression of scientific studies have facilitated the continued expansion of coal mining in Germany. As late as in 2006, the company continued to deny a causal link between the burning of coal and climate change in a court case.

To understand and manage resistance, RWE has conducted large-scale acceptance studies, organised roundtables, and collaborated with researchers, conservation organisations, and environmental volunteers. In RWE’s regular conservation conferences, volunteers and researchers are given a platform to present their findings and RWE celebrate their nature restoration work. In return, they don’t mention the company’s role in causing climate catastrophe.

Photograph by UNWISEMONKEYS

All of these are classic counterinsurgency strategies to repress, pacify, and co-opt dissent – a combination of psychological operations, intimidation, and surveillance – including rape threats and sexual abuse – combined with physical violence and beatings.

Pressure on the press

The violence inherent in coal mining, climate catastrophe, and RWE’s repression of dissent is covered up by a well-oiled propaganda machine that consists of PR agencies, RWE departments, police forces, and other state structures.

Intimidation and violence against the press help to reduce negative coverage, with threats of withdrawal of advertising and cancellation of subscriptions, campaigners have reported. In time for the Lützerath eviction, RWE published guidelines that restricted media coverage by journalists, requiring additional police accreditation and limiting access to certain areas, to day-time, and only when accompanied by RWE representatives. Much of the eviction – and police violence – took place at night and in other areas, however. When no journalists were present, protesters report, police were not only physically violent but used psychological violence, verbal abuse, and intimidation.

Power in the courts

A few days ago, RWE announced that they will be suing for compensation payments from the resistance movement for additional costs during the Lützerath eviction.

But soon, the company will itself be in court – RWE is being tried by Saúl Luciano Lliuya, a Peruvian farmer supported by the German NGO Germanwatch, to pay for adaptation measures to protect his land from melting glaciers. RWE is responsible for 0.47 percent of global climate change, so he is asking for 0.47 percent of adaptation costs. The hearing will take place in front of the Higher Regional Court Hamm. If successful, this could be ground-breaking.

At the same time, RWE has announced that it will be suing for compensation payments of 1.4 million Euro from two protesters who had blockaded RWE’s Neurath power station during the COP 26 negotiations in 2021. The action had forced RWE to reduce its operations by 32% and saved 8000 tons of CO2, according to activists.

While they were on trial, another group blockaded the same power station, showing RWE: we will not be intimidated.

The struggle continues.

POLLEN ´23 is coming!

Good afternoon Pollinators

We are pleased to announce the commencement of registration for the upcoming POLLEN ’23 conference between the 27th to 29th June at Howard College in Durban South Africa. The main registration period will run between the 1st of Feb and into March, where those whose session and presentation proposals were accepted will be able to begin the registration process. We will send more details and links in due course, but for now please take note of these few important points:

  • The structure of the conference is primarily a collection of sessions organised independently by session organisers. We, therefore, remind session organisers to communicate and relay information to all their participants, as we do not have their emails ourselves before they are properly registered.
  • Related to the above, if you are a presenter in a session and have not heard back from your session organiser, please do reach out and contact them to confirm your participation.
  • We are still in the process of reviewing bursary applications and making awards to those who applied. Communications will follow about this in February, so we ask bursary applicants to await the outcomes before undertaking registration.
  • As participants will recall, we had a number of covid enforced changes to the format, and are still awaiting RSVPs from some accepted session organisers and individual presenters. Even if you don’t intend to participate, please do let us know if you plan to attend so we can improve our planning and programming, and potentially allow extra sessions in your place.
  • Finally, as indicated in our December email, we still have a few spaces available for sessions and/or individual presentations for those who may be interested in joining us in Durban. We will not open a new CFP, but will instead conduct a first-come-first-served, peer-reviewed process to select additional presenters, and in particular, hope to include further participation from South Africa and the region to bolster local support and networking. If you are interested, please send an email to nela@ukzn.ac.za to enquire further.

Many thanks

Adrian and the POLLEN23 Local Organising Committee

To close 2022: Here´s to happiness, harmony, and fulfillment!

Dear POLLEN members,

We, the POLLEN group at LUCSUS and current Secretariat for the next 18 months, kindly wish you happy holidays, a life with harmony, and a new year filled with fulfillments.

To those spending their holidays away from their loved ones, or away from their lands, be it on grounds of exercising their rights to protest to stop the ecological crisis or of running away from the devastations this crisis provokes, we express our steadfast support.

Let us gather our strength to continue doing political ecology in 2023.

POLITICAL ECOLOGY ACROSS BOUNDARIES – Final asynchronous POLLEN workshop of 2022

Good morning/afternoon/evening Pollinators

We have come to the 6th and final of the preconference asynchronous workshops. You can check out the first 5 – on Radical Epistemologies and Future Natures; Emotional Ecologies; Power and Social Movements; Conservation and Agrarian Change and Blue Political Ecologies – on the conference website https://pollen2022.com/. Overall there have been some fantastic engagements on diverse and interesting themes of relevance to political ecology and we are happy to introduce the final workshop kicking off next week.

The workshop theme is Political Ecology Across Boundaries, and is co-hosted by Brock Bersaglio, Francis Massé and Charis Ennis and will run form the 12th to the 15th of Dec. It brings together three sessions that in different ways engage political ecology in ways that transgresses boundaries, be they disciplinary, epistemic, geographical, physical or structural. Full details can be found below and on the Worksop webpage (live from Monday) – https://pollen2022.com/asynchronous-workshops/political-ecology-across-boundaries/

We hope you enjoy the workshop, and extend a huge thanks for the co-hosts of this workshop and all the others for the work they have put in to curate the six workshops. We look forward to engaging more thoroughly now with the POLLEN23 in person conference planning for Durban, with registration opening in the new year.

Regards

Adrian and the LOC

POLITICAL ECOLOGY ACROSS BOUNDARIES

POLLEN2022 Pre-conference Workshop

Hosted by Brock Bersaglio (University of Birmingham), Francis Massé (Northumbria University), Charis Enns (University of Manchester)

12-15 Dec 2022

The theme for the POLLEN 22/3 conference is Political Ecology, North South and Beyond; and there is a specific need to interrogate aspects of the ‘beyond’ – exploring ways in which political ecology approaches can be mobilised across boundaries, variously construed. Political ecology encourages critical reflection around the entanglements and encounters of political ecology with a variety of theories, approaches, and philosophies, and has been central to recent transdisciplinary debates about multi-species entanglements, biodiversity crisis, extinction, climate, racialisation, (de)coloniality, uneven and unequal geographical exchange, and the envisioning of alternative sustainability’s. This workshop brings together three sessions that in different ways speak to these themes and engage political ecology in ways that transgresses boundaries; be they disciplinary, epistemic, geographical, physical or structural. The sessions variously deal with spaces in which theoretical claims meet practical transdisciplinary challenges in Social-Ecological research, draw non-human entities into analysis of socio-ecological conflict, and reflect on political ecologies’ transformative role in repoliticizing spaces of technocratic power and marginalisation to pluralize roles, debates, and solutions to socio-ecological challenges. The result is a set of presentations and discussions which mobilise political ecology in novel and transformative ways and seek to expand discussions of its utility as a dynamic approach.

Workshop webpage (live from Monday) – https://pollen2022.com/asynchronous-workshops/political-ecology-across-boundaries/

Session information

Session 1: Researching social-ecological conflicts – Bringing non-human entities into the analysis (Part 1 & 2)(ID: 107 & 108)

Session organizer(s):     

Dr. Markus Rauchecker, ISOE – Institute for Social-Ecological Research, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, rauchecker@isoe.de

Dr. Fanny Frick-Trzebitzky, ISOE – Institute for Social-Ecological Research, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, frick@isoe.de

Heide Kerber, ISOE – Institute for Social-Ecological Research, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, kerber@isoe.de

Session 2: Synergy or contrast? When Political Ecology theoretical claims meet practical transdisciplinary challenges in Social-Ecological research projects

Session organizer(s):     

Dr. Fanny Frick-Trzebitzky, ISOE – Institute for Social-Ecological Research, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, frick@isoe.de

Heide Kerber, ISOE – Institute for Social-Ecological Research, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, kerber@isoe.de

Dr. Markus Rauchecker, ISOE – Institute for Social-Ecological Research, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, rauchecker@isoe.de

Session 3: Actualizing the potential of political ecology in transformative change I: Dismantling power (ID: 21)

Session organizer(s):      Josephine Chambers, Utrecht University, <j.m.chambers@uu.nl>

                                             Sierra Deutsch, University of Zürich, <sierra.deutsch@uzh.ch>

November 2022 Updates

November 2022 Update 

Dear POLLEN Members and Friends, 

Winter finally arrived to Sweden in mid-November. In Lund, where the Secretariat is now based, it snowed and the snow even stayed for a few days! Once the snow melted away, the darkness took over as “saving the planet” was promoted to the top of the list of depoliticized issues by becoming the only cause internationally accepted for the eventwashing of repressive authoritarian regimes. The need for critical and emancipatory political ecology scholarship and action couldn’t be bigger these days…

Has your POLLEN node NOT been introduced by us? If your node is keen to share your work in upcoming newsletters, please write to us at 

politicalecologynetwork@gmail.com

We also welcome proposals for blog posts on the POLLEN blog – please contact us at the same email address with any ideas! 

We are pleased to post the latest publications, CfPs and more from our lively community. 

With best regards from your POLLEN Secretariat 

Torsten Krause, Juan Samper, Mine Islar and Wim Carton 

IMPORTANT! To get the best view of this newsletter, please enable the media content at the top of the e-mail. 

Publications 

Journal articles 

  1. Ali Rafaeifar et al., (2022). Decarbonize the military – mandate emissions reporting. Nature. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03444-7  
  1. Bluwstein, J., & Cavanagh, C. (2022). Rescaling the land rush? Global political ecologies of land use and cover change in key scenario archetypes for achieving the 1.5° C Paris agreement target. The Journal of Peasant Studies, Ahead-of-print, https://doi.org/10.1080/03066150.2022.2125386
  1. Luque-Lora, Rogelio (2022) The trouble with relational values. Environmental Values, Fast Track https://doi.org/10.3197/096327122X16611552268681  
  1. Lyons, K. (2022) ‘Nature’ and territories as victims: Decolonizing Colombia’s transitional justice process. American Anthropologist. https://doi.org/10.1111/aman.13798  
  1. McConnell, K. (2022) ‘The Green New Deal’ as partisan cue: Evidence from a survey experiment in the rural U.S. Environmental Politics. https://doi.org/10.1080/09644016.2022.2090655 
  1. Pas, A., & Cavanagh, C. (2022). Understanding ‘night grazing’: Conservation governance, rural inequalities, and shifting responses ‘from above and below’ throughout the nychthemeron in Laikipia, Kenya. Geoforum134, 143-153. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016718522000926 
  1. Special Issue Acme Journal: Monumentality, memoryscapes, and the politics of place. https://acme-journal.org/index.php/acme/issue/view/131  

Books & book chapters 

  1. Cammack, P. (2022) The politics of global competitiveness. Oxford University Press. https://academic.oup.com/book/38762?login=true  
  1. Fabricant, N. (2022). Fighting to breathe: Race, toxicity, and the rise of youth activism in Baltimore. California Series in Public Anthropology. University of California Press. 1st Edition. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520379329/fighting-to-breathe   
  1. Fletcher, R. (2022). Failing forward: The rise and fall of neoliberal conservation. University of California Press. 1st Edition. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520390690/failing-forward 
  1. Ramnath, K. (2023). Boats in a storm: Law, migration, and decolonization in South and South East Asia, 1942-1962. Stanford University Press. https://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=34914 
  1. Rodrigues Machaqueiro, R. (2023) The carbo calcultation: Global climate policy, forests, and transnational governance in Brazil and Mozambique. The University of Arizona Press. https://uapress.arizona.edu/book/the-carbon-calculation  

Events 

  1. Climate and land (in)justice: inequalities, intersections, and opportunities for justice in Southeast Asia. 
    When: Nov 30, 2022 
    More info: https://www.kasasustainability.org/environmental-change-workshop  
  1. DIALOGUES IN RADICAL GEOGRAPHY Third Edition: The Cost of Living under Intensified Austerity 
    Featuring Professor Mia Gray & Tilly Mason 
    Friday 16th December, 15.00-16.30 GMT 
    Live at the RGS-IBG building in London and synchronously online 
    Tickets are free and open to all: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/dialogues-in-radical-geography-tickets-466220717717  

Vacancies 

  1. The Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland is accepting applications for our Fall 2023 Ph.D. Program. Applications are due by December 15th, 2022 and requirements are posted here: https://geog.umd.edu/graduate/application-requirements. The Department of Geographical Sciences at UMD offers generous funding, benefits, and tuition remission packages https://geog.umd.edu/graduate/assistantships-and-fellowships. Contact Dr. Leila De Floriani (deflo@umd.edu) or Dr. Rachel Haber (rberndts@umd.edu) for application or program questions. We hope to receive your application this season! 
  1. Adjunct Professor Environmental Studies at Dickinson College 
    Candidates should submit the following via QUEST (online application system) at https://jobs.dickinson.edu: Letter of interest; Contact details for two references (at least one speaking to teaching ability); Teaching statement that references the candidate’s teaching philosophy, experience and ability to teach an upper level course in their area of expertise; Current CV. Review of applications will begin on January 15, 2023 and continue until the position is filled. 
  1. The Department of International Environment and Development Studies (Noragric), Faculty of Landscape and Society (LANDSAM) at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) has a vacant 4-year PhD–position in International Environment and Development Studies with one year of project work included. 
    We invite candidates to develop their research ideas on the links between land dispossession, elite capture and growth of jihadist groups in the West African Sahel. Recent research has pointed at land dispossession and elite capture in explaining why many people in the Sahel decide to join armed insurgency groups. This PhD position will be part of a new five-year project funded by an Advanced Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) entitled LANDRESPONSE, which will study conflict and migration in the Sahel as parallel processes with potentially similar causes. 
    More info: https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/234930/phd-within-international-environment-and-development-studies-violent-resistance-and-land-governance-in-the-sahel  
  1. The Department of International Environment and Development Studies (Noragric), Faculty of Landscape and Society (LANDSAM) at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) has a vacant 4-year PhD–position in International Environment and Development Studies with one year of project work included. 
    We invite candidates to develop their research ideas on migration from West Africa to Europe with a focus on land dispossession as a potential driver. This PhD position will be part of a new five-year project funded by an Advanced Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) entitled LANDRESPONSE, which will study conflict and migration in the Sahel as parallel processes with potentially similar causes. 
    More info: https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/234936/phd-scholarship-within-international-environment-and-development-studies-migration-from-west-africa  
  1. The Department of International Environment and Development Studies (Noragric), Faculty of Landscape and Society at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) has TWO VACANTS position as researcher for 39 months related to a new five-year project funded by an Advanced Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) entitled LANDRESPONSE. This research project will study conflict and migration in the Sahel as parallel processes with potentially similar causes. 
    Vacant 1 more info: https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/234950/researcher-within-international-environment-and-development-studies-land-use-conflicts-in-the-sahel  
    Vacant 2 more info: https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/234954/researcher-within-international-environment-and-development-studies-migration-from-west-africa  
  1. The University of Manchester is seeking to appoint two Research Associates for the Sustainable Forest Transitions (SFT) project. SFT is a five-year, £1.7 million project funded as part of a UKRI Research Frontier grant based within the Global Development Institute in the School of Environment, Education and Development. The SFT project will conduct ground-breaking research to better understand how reforestation drivers affect forests and the communities that depend on them. Over the next five years, SFT will study the changing nature of forest cover and human development at unprecedented scale and detail. The SFT project will start working in Mexico, Brazil, India, and Nepal and very possibly expand to other countries. These two posts offer the opportunity for outstanding individuals to make a significant contribution to an exciting international sustainability research programme based at the University of Manchester. For a clearer sense of SFT’s research agenda, please see the publications pages of the project’s website (https://sites.manchester.ac.uk/sftresearch/). 
  1. Three PhD studentships on the social and environmental outcomes of reforestation processes at the University of Manchester. 
    More info: https://www.findaphd.com/phds/programme/three-phd-studentships-on-the-social-and-environmental-outcomes-of-reforestation-processes/?p5859  
    Deadline: 5th of January, 2023 
  1. Two Doctoral Students: Intersectional Political Ecologies of the Commons at the University of Laussane. 
    More info: https://career5.successfactors.eu/career?career%5fns=job%5flisting&company=universitdP&navBarLevel=JOB%5fSEARCH&rcm%5fsite%5flocale=fr%5fFR&career_job_req_id=20469&selected_lang=en_US&jobAlertController_jobAlertId=&jobAlertController_jobAlertName=&browserTimeZone=Europe/Zurich&_s.crb=j3u6SlZI8utLaBZsfW7knm%2fxBt1nR9WkdnQB13BzWds%3d  
    Deadline: December 10, 2022 
  1. Postdoctoral Researcher SNSF (80%) in Intersectional Political Ecologies at the University of Laussane. 
    More info: https://career5.successfactors.eu/career?career%5fns=job%5flisting&company=universitdP&navBarLevel=JOB%5fSEARCH&rcm%5fsite%5flocale=fr%5fFR&career_job_req_id=20549&selected_lang=en_US&jobAlertController_jobAlertId=&jobAlertController_jobAlertName=&browserTimeZone=Europe/Zurich&_s.crb=xVWRjLJpvrGYe%2bsPgKFYSwFEpDw2%2fB4gL08CLGMtIik%3d  
    Deadline: December 10, 2022 
  1. 3-year vacancy for a PhD Candidate in STS at NTNU. 
    The PhD candidate will work within the area of Sustainability Transitions research focusing on transformative policy mixes for cross-sectoral interactions and societal acceptance of Hydrogen. The current development of the hydrogen economy in Norway is built on a multi-level logic where regional, national and international dynamics interact, and where interests across sectors need to be aligned to succeed. This project uses the concept of transformative policy mixes for cross-sectoral interactions to understand the interactions between levels and sectors, to advance community acceptance, policy acceptance and market acceptance for hydrogen in Norway and beyond. 
    Deadline: December 5, 2022 
    More info: https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/232563/phd-candidate-in-science-and-technology-studies  
  1. One Faculty Positionin Feminist Political and/or Economic Geographies in/of Asia Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track) or Associate Professor (With Tenure) at the National University of Singapore. 
    Deadline: December 5, 2022 
    More info: https://fass.nus.edu.sg/geog/2022/10/03/faculty-position-in-feminist-political-and-or-economic-geographies-in-of-asia/  

Calls 

  1. Call for contributions: 
    Review of African Political Economy special issue, titled ‘The climate emergency in Africa: crisis, solutions and resistance’ 
    Themes: Extraction and the exploitation of fossil fuels // War, repression and climate change // Renewable energy sources and labour // Climate disaster in Africa and its impacts // Solutions 
    More info: https://roape.net/2022/10/06/roape-special-issue-call-for-contributors-the-climate-emergency-in-africa-crisis-solutions-and-resistance/ 
  1. Call for Abstracts:  
    International Conference “Sustainable Food and Biomass Futures. Localised approaches to agricultural change and bioeconomy”, June 22-24, 2023, Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development, Germany 
    More info here: https://www.transect.de/call-for-papers-international-conference-on-sustainable-food-and-biomass-futures 
  1. Call for Proposals: 
    Antipode’s “Right to the Discipline” grants 
    More info: https://antipodeonline.org/a-right-to-the-discipline/ 
  1. Call for Papers: 
    Contesting human-wildlife interactions in the context of commons 
    More info: https://beastlybusiness.org/2022/11/17/cfp-iasc-2023-contesting-human-wildlife-interactions-in-the-context-of-commons/  
    Deadline: 12th of december, 2022 
  1. Call for Papers: 
    Environment and Society: Advances in research. Thematic focus: Reforestation.  
    Deadline for abstracts: December 5, 2022 
    More info: https://journals.berghahnbooks.com/_uploads/air-es/ares-cfp-2022-v15.pdf  
  1. Call for Proposals: 
    Ecology, economy, and society – The INSEE Journal is an open access, peer reviewed journal of Indian Society for Ecological Economics (INSEE<https://ecoinsee.org/>), a registered society since 1999. It is indexed in Scopus<https://www.scopus.com/sourceid/21101049095> and recognized by the UGC-CARE<https://ugccare.unipune.ac.in/Apps1/Home/Index>. EES offers authors a forum to address socio-environmental issues from, across and within the natural and social sciences, with an aim to promote methodological pluralism and inter-disciplinary research. 
    EES is proposing a special issue on Political Ecology for Volume 6(2), to be published in July 2023. 
    Deadline for abstract submissions: December 31, 2022 
    More info: Write to insee.ees@gmail.com<mailto:insee.ees@gmail.com> or kuntala.lahiri-dutt@anu.edu.au<mailto:kuntala.lahiri-dutt@anu.edu.au
     

Other news items 

  1. An ecosocialist strategy to win the future by Sabrina Fernandes: https://www.rosalux.de/en/news/id/49515/an-ecosocialist-strategy-to-win-the-future  
  1. The ESRC STEPS Centre has updated its free online course on Pathways to Sustainability, with a series of six video lectures and reading lists. It’s being made available open access, and we hope it will be of interest as background material for students and teachers on courses related to sustainability, political ecology and international development. 
    https://steps-centre.org/online-course-pathways-to-sustainability/ 
    The course introduces a set of ideas, approaches, cases and methods for critical research and action on sustainability. Sections include: 
    The Pathways Approach  
    Uncertainty  
    Technology & Innovation 
    Resource Politics 
    Policy Processes  
    Methods and Methodologies  
    *There is no fee or time-limit for individuals who wish to take the course, and all the videos and most reading suggestions are Open Access. 
  1. What are the ties between farming and finance? More info: http://institutionallandscapes.org/  

Blue Political Ecologies Workshop!

Virtual  workshop on Blue Political Ecologies 8th and 9th November, with subsequent asynchronous content engagement

We would like to welcome you to a virtual workshop on blue political ecologies, which will take place from the 8th and 9th of November. The event is co-hosted by Synne Movik (Norwegian University of Life Sciences),Emilie Wiehe (University of Guelph), Mialy Andriamahefazafy (University of Geneva), Marleen Schutter (Worldfish & University of Washington) and Mark Lamont (Open University), with support from Noé Mendoza, NMBU

There will be four sessions based  on short presentations that you are welcome to attend live (please follow the link provided on the website), or you can engage with the presentations asynchronously once they are recorded and made available (1-2 days after the live session). There will be a comments box where you can share your questions, thoughts, and reflections. 

The oceans are being framed increasingly as a site of degradation and in need of conservation (Bennett, 2019; Gray, 2018), while simultaneously being promoted as the new economic frontier through blue economy frameworks and discourses of blue growth (Ertör and Hadjimichael 2020; Silver & Campbell, 2018). Critical scholars have drawn attention to conflict surrounding marine space and marine resources (e.g. Bavinck et al, 2018; Menon et al, 2016), the scalar politics of marine governance (Campbell, 2007; Gruby et al, 2013), fisheries politics, access and the neoliberalization of fisheries (Mansfield, 2004; Andriamahefazafy & Kull, 2019), the role of knowledge and technology in producing the marine environment (Gray, 2018; Drakopulos, 2019), and the political ecologies of emerging blue economies (Marleen & Hicks, 2019; Carver, 2019; Bond, 2019), to name a few. More recently, as the blue economy continues to be pushed as a development framework, scholars and practitioners alike are calling for increased attention to issues of blue justice – though there are signs that the term is being appropriated by powerful international actors,  diluting it and rendering it apolitical. Political ecology thus provides useful insights to make visible the political in marine governance and the blue economy and to examine power relations inherent in these realms.   The blue political ecologies workshops in this series of sessions aim to explore how power and politics, access and resource conflict continue to shape marine resource use and governance. Papers and discussions in this workshop also aim to further bridge research-practitioner gaps, particularly with regards to furthering blue justice aims.

On Tuesday 8th of November, there will be two panel sessions, as follows

  • Political Ecologies of the Blue Economy (organised  by Mark Lamont) 
  • Decolonizing Fisheries Governance (co-ordinated by (Mialy  Andriamahefazafy)

On Wednesday 9th of November, there will be two presentation sessions and a LIVE discussion, as follows:

  • Coastal transformation and spatial justice (co-ordinated by Synne Movik)
  • Advancing blue justice (coordinated by Emilie Wiehe)

Detailed programme available herehttps://politicalecology.space/blue_political_ecologies/

Session link:  https://nmbu.zoom.us/j/62252282756

These will be followed by a live discussion session focusing on how to mobilise for greater equity and justice (coordinated by Mialy Andriamahefazafy and Marleen Schutter). 

The session will be kicked off by three short talks, which  will provide the basis for a discussion on how we can draw on pol political ecology to advance equity and justice.  We encourage you to join this live session, using the link provided on the webpage. 

Please do not hesitate to get in touch with the co-host Emilie Wiehe ewiehe@uoguelph.ca should you have questions and comments, and we really hope that you will engage with the issues that are being raised, either through the live discussion, or through leaving comments, questions and reflections in the comments box on the website. 

Regards,

Adrian and the POLLEN22/3 LOC, and workshop co-hosts Synne, Emilie, Mialy, Marleen, and Mark

Political Ecology, Conservation, and Agrarian Change

Good morning/afternoon/evening Pollinators.

We are now in the middle of the 4th POLLEN22/3 preconference workshop, entitled Conservation and Agrarian Change, co-hosten by Sam Staddon and Omar Saif (University of Edinburgh, UK) and Sayan Banerjee (National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, India).

Conservation and agrarian change have been staple interests of political ecology ever since it emerged as a discipline, with political ecologists exploring and engaging with cases and processes around the world. This on-line pre-conference workshop discusses on going and emerging political ecology approaches to conservation from a range of perspectives, including the neoliberalisation of nature in Protected Areas, the opportunities of ‘Convivial’ conservation, Other-Than-Human political ecologies of wildlife conservation, and the demand to cultivate ‘critical reflexivity’ for conservation. It engages in agrarian change through a focus on the reasons and effects of deagrarianisation and through political ecologies of ‘sustainable’ global food supply chains.

We have 6 Sessions in the workshop, each with a series of pre-recorded presentations by political ecologists from around the world. We invite you to watch these pre-recorded presentations, and to engage with the online discussion forum in order to share your own experiences, insights and questions. 4 out of our 6 Sessions also have a Live Discussion scheduled during this week, and we invite you to join us for those. We also have a Final workshop Live Discussion, to bring together the issues and interests and ideas shared across all 6 Sessions.

Session details (N.B. Please note the timings, as there is a switch from BST and CEST at the start of the workshop, to GMT and CET by the end of it):

  1. The production and neoliberalisation of nature in the PAs. Towards a public political ecology | Noelia Garcia Rodriguez [no Live Discussion]
  2. Cultivating Critical Reflexivity for Conservation | Sam Staddon, Omar Saif, Fleur Nash, Timur Jack-Kadioglu. Live recording available online)
  3. Convivial conservation: opportunities and limitations? | Judith Krauss, Laila Sandroni and Mathew Bukhi Mabele. Live Discussion 28th October (12.30-13.30 BST / 13.30-14.30 CEST)
  4. Other-than-Human Political Ecologies of Wildlife Conservation | Sayan Banerjee. Live Discussion 28th October (14.00-15.00 BST / 15.00-16.00 CEST)
  5. Deagrarianisation: what are the underlying reasons and effects with focus on livelihoods, poverty reduction and climate change | Sheona Shackleton, Klara Fischer     [No Live Discussion]
  6. The political ecology of “sustainable” global food supply chains: prospects and limits for transformative change | Joss Lyons-White, Izabela Delabre, Rachael D. Garrett. Live Discussion 31st October (15:00 – 16:00 GMT / 16:00-17:00 CET)
  7. Final Workshop Live Discussion 31st October (16:15 -17:15 GMT / 17:15 -16:15 CET)

 ALL Live Discussions can be joined using this link:

Thanks, Adrian and the LOC

October 2022 Updates

October 2022 Update 

Dear POLLEN Members and Friends, 

We send this update from Lund’s Botanical Garden, as the unusual autumn warmth in Sweden still allows for working outside.

Has your POLLEN node NOT been introduced by us? If your node is keen to share your work in upcoming newsletters, please write to us at 

politicalecologynetwork@gmail.com

We also welcome proposals for blog posts on the POLLEN blog – please contact us at the same email address with any ideas! 

We are pleased to post the latest publications, CfPs and more from our lively community. 

With best regards from your POLLEN Secretariat 

Torsten Krause, Juan Samper, Mine Islar and Wim Carton 

IMPORTANT! To get the best view of this newsletter, please enable the media content at the top of the e-mail. 

Publications

Books and book chapters 

  1. Campos, L. & Patoine, P. (2022) Life, Re-scaled: The Biological Imagination in Twenty-First-Century Literature and Performance. Open Book Publishers. https://doi.org/10.11647/OBP.0303 
  1. Milne, S. (2022) Corporate Nature: An insiders ethnography of global conservation. The University of Arizona Press. https://uapress.arizona.edu/book/corporate-nature  
  1. Staddon S. (2022) Critically Understanding Livelihoods in the Global South: Researchers, research practices and power. In: Routledge Handbook on Livelihoods in the Global South, Eds. F. Nunan, C. Barnes & S. Krishnamurthy. Routledge, pp. 81-92. https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003014041-10/critically-understanding-livelihoods-global-south-sam-staddon 
  1. Stoetzer, B. (2022) Ruderal city: Ecologies of Migration, Race, and Urban Nature in Berlin. Duke University Press. https://www.dukeupress.edu/ruderal-city  

Journal articles 

  1. Fair, H. et al., 2022. Dodo dilemmas: Conflicting ethical loyalties in conservation social science research. AREA. https://doi.org/10.1111/area.12839 
  1. Gómez-Baggethun, E. 2022. Political ecological correctness and the problem of limits. Political Geography 98: 102622 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0962629822000361?via%3Dihub 
  1. Mabele, MB., Kamnde, K., Bwagalilo, F. and Kalumanga, E. 2022. Calling for landscape-level assessments of participatory forestry’s role in improving biophysical conditions. Forest Policy and Economics 143, 102816  
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.forpol.2022.102816 
  1. Rogers, S. & Han, X. & Wilmsen, B., (2022) “Apples and oranges: political crops with and against the state in rural China”, Journal of Political Ecology 29(1), p.496–512. doi: https://doi.org/10.2458/jpe.4698 
  1. Saif O., Keane, A. & Staddon S. (2022) Making a case for the consideration of trust, justice, and power in conservation relationships. Conservation Biology, 36. https://www.pure.ed.ac.uk/ws/portalfiles/portal/264380573/Saif._Keane._Staddon..pdf  
  1. Trauger, A., (2022) “The vegan industrial complex: the political ecology of not eating animals”. Journal of Political Ecology 29(1), 639–655. doi: https://doi.org/10.2458/jpe.3052 

Events 

  1. The Solidarity Economy Experiments of Indonesia’s Peasant and Fisher Movements 
    Join Dr Iqra Anugrah (Kyoto University) to reflect on Indonesia’s rural political economy, and learn about the achievements and limits of solidarity economy projects carried out by farming and fishing communities in Indonesia. 
    When: Thursday 27 October 2022, 5pm PT / 8pm ET 
                 Friday 28 October 2022, 7am WIB / 11am AEDT 
    Where: Online via Zoom  Register here. 
  1. Palm Oil: The Grease of Empire book event at Lakehead 
    When: October 28 
    Where: Hybrid. Register here: https://reimaginingvalue.ca/palm-oil-tb/  
  1. The race to protect the Amazon: What does the future hold? 
    The aim of this event is to discuss how the changing political momentum in Colombia and Brazil is affecting the fate of the Amazon and the challenges that remain to protect the remaining rainforest areas. 
    Venue: Online (zoom) 
    More info: http://www.focali.se/en/events/the-race-to-protect-the-amazon-2013-what-does-the-future-hold  
  1. Global Extraction Film Festival 
    October 26-30 
    More info: https://www.caribbeancreativity.nl/events/global-extraction-film-festival-2022/  
  1. Political ecology seminar series at Université de Laussane: Thinking with plants and animals. 
    More info: https://www.unil.ch/files/live/sites/igd/files/Seminaires/PE-Seminar-Series-autumn-2022.pdf  

Vacancies 

  1. Please find below a job offer for 2 PhD positions on questions of energy politics and authoritarian power in the MENA, based in Freiburg/Germany: 
     
    The Arnold Bergstraesser Institute (ABI) at the University of Freiburg (Germany) is seeking to fill two positions as Doctoral Researcher (Salary Level 65% TVL E 13) on the topics: 
     
    “The political economy of solar energy in Morocco” 
    “The political economy of solar energy in Jordan” 
     
    The positions are part of an Emmy Noether Junior Research Group, funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), led by Dr. Benjamin Schuetze, and hosted by the ABI, on the overall topic ‘Renewable Energies, Renewed Authoritarianisms? The Political Economy of Solar Energy in the Middle East and North Africa’. 
     
    The successful candidates are expected to move to Freiburg, Germany, and start by April 1, 2023. Initial contracts will be for 2.5 years with possible extension of another 1.5 years. The selected candidates will enroll as PhD students with the University of Freiburg’s Faculty of Humanities, supervised by Dr. Benjamin Schuetze, and be provided with office space at the ABI. For further information please see the attached PDF and/or the following link: https://www.arnold-bergstraesser.de/news/stellenausschreibung-doctoral-researcher-tvl-e-13-65 
     
    Deadline: Applications should be sent to benjamin.schuetze[at]abi.uni-freiburg.de by November 6, 2022 (as one single PDF file), and should include the following: 

    Motivation letter (1-2 pages) 
    CV, including names and contact details of two referees 
    Copies of university degrees (BA and MA) 
    Work sample (MA thesis chapter, published article, or similar) 
    PhD project outline (2-3 pages) 
  1. The Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland is accepting applications for our Fall 2023 Ph.D. Program. Applications are due by December 15th, 2022 and requirements are posted here: https://geog.umd.edu/graduate/application-requirements. The Department of Geographical Sciences at UMD offers generous funding, benefits, and tuition remission packages https://geog.umd.edu/graduate/assistantships-and-fellowships. Contact Dr. Leila De Floriani (deflo@umd.edu) or Dr. Rachel Haber (rberndts@umd.edu) for application or program questions. We hope to receive your application this season! 
  1. The Department of Geographical Sciences at University of Maryland, College Park also has multiple job openings focused on conservation criminology and human dimensions of global environmental change: 

Assistant Research Professor/Post Doc Associate(https://ejobs.umd.edu/postings/101123). The intersectionality of wildlife trafficking and biosafety from zoonotic pathogens and vectors has not received significant attention although there are serious implications for health and national security. The applicant(s) research will support critical surveillance, biosafety, and security (SB&S) efforts by creating new, and enhancing existing, capacity to address risks at the intersection of human-animal-ecosystem health, wildlife trafficking and zoonotic pathogens using geographical sciences. The applicant will join a dynamic and diverse interdisciplinary team with the unique experience and expertise to focus on anthrax and other zoonotic pathogens of security concern and pandemic potential in South Africa’s and Mozambique’s segments of The Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area (GLTFCA), an unfenced transnational peace park. 

Post-Doctoral Research Associate (https://ejobs.umd.edu/postings/101049). The illegal harvest and trade in wild flora and fauna undermines sustainable development, erodes local and global economies, poses security risks to local people, degrades the carbon capture potential of forests, and facilitates the spread of zoonotic diseases. No group of species so perfectly embodies the limits of current conservation practice than pangolins – the most trafficked wild mammals globally. Pangolins represent the socio-ecological systems within which many high value species are illegally harvested and traded globally. This research capitalizes on the latest advances in technology, interdisciplinary conservation science, big data, and artificial intelligence to generate and unify diverse data sources to inform sustainable and cost-effective solutions to the global biodiversity crisis associated with wildlife crime. The research will synthesize information from wildlife crime, population monitoring, and socio-ecological systems through cutting edge artificial intelligence (AI) analytical pipelines to support: 1) sustainable, socially legitimate, and locally led conservation interventions, 2) evidence-informed international policy implementation, and 3) predictive tools for addressing wildlife crime. 

Faculty Specialist (https://ejobs.umd.edu/postings/101048). This is a full time position responsible for supporting and coordinating a large international, multi-institution research collaboration including project management; assisting in the logistical planning of research activities including remote international fieldwork, workshops, meetings and conferences, overseeing travel arrangements; maintaining the projects’ research profiles on a project website; tracking milestones of project implementation specific to the funding requirements; editing technical reports and papers; assisting in vital communication between co-researchers, sponsors, and collaborative organizations; assisting the project director in administering the project by formulating and monitoring project budgets, coordinating and supervise the arrangements for foreign visitors and interns working on the projects, as well as various other tasks as required for the smooth functioning of large research projects. 

  1. PhD Scholarship on Critical geographies, political ecologies of forestry and biosecurity in Northern Australia at the University of Wollongong, Australiaassociated with Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship Project FT 200100006 (https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/jenny_atchison). 
  1. Assistant Professor, Ecological Stewardship and Community-Centered Indigenous Research at the University of Connecticut 
    More info: https://jobs.hr.uconn.edu/en-us/job/496909/assistant-professor-ecological-stewardship-and-communitycentered-indigenous-research 
    Review of applications will begin on November 10, 2022, and continue until the position is filled. For more information please visit the unit website: Anthropology. For questions about this position, please contact Deborah Bolnick (deborah.bolnick@uconn.edu). 
  1. Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Chester 
    More info: https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/CTZ680/lecturer-in-human-geography-06fte  
    Deadline: 1st of Nov, 2022 
  1. One Faculty Position in Feminist Political and/or Economic Geographies in/of AsiaAssistant Professor (Tenure-Track) or Associate Professor (With Tenure) at the Department of Geography at the National University of Singapore 
    More info: https://careers.nus.edu.sg/NUS/job/Kent-Ridge-AssistantAssociate-Professor-%28FeministEconomic-Geographies%29-Kent/10946644/  
  1. Adjunct Professor Environmental Studies at Dickinson College 
    Candidates should submit the following via QUEST (online application system) at https://jobs.dickinson.edu: Letter of interest; Contact details for two references (at least one speaking to teaching ability); Teaching statement that references the candidate’s teaching philosophy, experience and ability to teach an upper level course in their area of expertise; Current CV. Review of applications will begin on January 15, 2023 and continue until the position is filled. 
  1. Funded PhD Position | Dartmouth College Graduate Program in Ecology, Evolution, Environment and Society 
    More info: https://ires.ubc.ca/funded-phd-position-dartmouth-college-graduate-program-in-ecology-evolution-environment-and-society/  

Calls 

  1. Call for contributions: 
    Review of African Political Economy special issue, titled ‘The climate emergency in Africa: crisis, solutions and resistance’ 
    Themes: Extraction and the exploitation of fossil fuels // War, repression and climate change // Renewable energy sources and labour // Climate disaster in Africa and its impacts // Solutions 
    More info: https://roape.net/2022/10/06/roape-special-issue-call-for-contributors-the-climate-emergency-in-africa-crisis-solutions-and-resistance/  
  1. Call for Abstracts:  
    International Conference “Sustainable Food and Biomass Futures. Localised approaches to agricultural change and bioeconomy”, June 22-24, 2023, Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development, Germany 
    More info here: https://www.transect.de/call-for-papers-international-conference-on-sustainable-food-and-biomass-futures  
    The deadline for abstract submission is December 7, 2022. 
  1. CFPapers:  
    Confronting Climate Coloniality: 2023 American Association of Geographers (AAG) annual conference, 23-27 March 2023, Denver CO, USA https://www.aag.org/events/aag2023/ 
    Abstracts of papers (100-200 words max) should be submitted no later than 2 Nov 2022 at this link: https://tinyurl.com/mumxadrm 
  1. Call for papers: 
    Ontological Destruction: Negotiating Trauma through Re-imagined & Practiced Human Non-Human Relations 
    Special session CFP, AAG, Denver, CO, Thursday March 23-Monday March 27, 2023. 
    Submit an abstract of no more than 200 word to Muhammad_Salman.Khan@kcl.ac.uk by November2, 2022.  
    The AAG deadline for submission is November 10, 2022. 
  1. Call for Proposals: 
    Antipode’s “Right to the Discipline” grants 
    More info: https://antipodeonline.org/a-right-to-the-discipline/  
  1. Call for papers: 
    Queer/trans ecologies: methodological considerations for critical geographical research 
    Deadline for EOIs 25 October 2022 
    To be considered for this panel please send a short statement of interest (250 words) outlining relevant research projects and areas of interest. Expressions of interest are also invited from those who wish to contribute in a facilitative role, for example as introducer or discussant. These and any questions should be directed to sage.brice@durham.ac.uk<mailto:sage.brice@durham.ac.uk> by 25 October 2022. 
  1. Call for papers: 
    Feminist Political Economies of Displacement 
    Papers may engage with some of the following themes: 
    -     Theorizing feminist political economies of displacement 
    -     Displacement and social reproduction 
    -     Displaced women’s detention and unfree labor 
    -     Affect and displaced labor subjectivities 
    Organizers: Shae Frydenlund (Indiana University Bloomington) and Georgina Ramsay (University of Delaware) 
  1. Call for papers: 
    Seeping, leaching, drifting: contaminated earth and colonial violence 
    AAG Annual Meeting. 23-27 March 2023. Denver, Colorado 
    Organisers: Kali Rubaii (Purdue University), Mark Griffiths (Newcastle University), Mikko Joronen (Tampere University) 
    We invite abstracts for papers that engage with the topic of toxified earth and colonial violence. Please send abstracts of ~250 words to jrubaii@purdue.edu<mailto:jrubaii@purdue.edu>; mark.griffiths@ncl.ac.uk<mailto:mark.griffiths@ncl.ac.uk>;  mikko.joronen@tuni.fi<mailto:mikko.joronen@tuni.fi> by 26 October 2022 
  1. Call for papers: 
    Anti-caste political ecologies 
    Organizers: Amani Ponnaganti (Wisconsin-Madison), Sahithya Venkatesan (Rutgers), and Tanya Matthan (UC-Berkeley) 
    Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words by October 31. Notice of acceptance will be sent out by November 4. Conference registration must be completed by November 10. 
    More info: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1drNgY1jYTEqb6-MH03_C6NTMYhHyrkVTW9qhjk2VeZg/edit  

Other news items 

  1. Report: A decade of defiance – Global Witness’s report: https://www.globalwitness.org/en/campaigns/environmental-activists/decade-defiance/  
  1. Opinion: Ecological civilization: why it is necessary and how can we create it? https://www.meer.com/en/70893-ecological-civilization  
  1. Article:Energy transition from below – Undisciplined Environments: Energy transition from below: From climate colonialism to energy sovereignty (En esp: La transición energética desde abajo: Del colonialismo climático a la soberanía energética