[Online event] Ibero-American Dialogues on eco-social perspectives and practices

The academic journal  Iberoamérica Social is organizing the first edition of “Diálogos Iberoamericanos“, a virtual venue to learn about the work of researchers in social sciences. On this occasion, scholars from different countries will be speaking about socio-environmental conflicts in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Date: February 12, 2021.

Time: 14h Mexico / 17h Brazil / 21h Spain.

You can join and get more information about this event through Facebook and/or YouTube.

Presenter: Raul Olmedo (UNAM, Mex)

Discussant: Adriana P. Gómez Bonilla (UAM-Iztapalapa, Mex)

Panelists:

Socio-environmental conflicts in Latin America and the Caribbean: A regional analysis from a Political Ecology perspective, Marx José Gómez Liendo (IVIC, Ven).

Cerro de Pasco and the development paradox: Imagining a transition to post-extractivism for a territory dependant on extractivism, Flavio Vila Skrzypek (UCAL, Perú).

Effects of hydroelectric megaprojects on indigenous gastronomy. The case of the San Felipe Usila municipality, Oaxaca Mexico, Carolina Mejía Martínez (Mexico).

Social nature, social divides and social media: an insight into tourism development in Argentinean highlands, Yancen Diemberger (Univ. of Exeter, Eng).

The mass-media in the disputes about nature. A theoretical-methodological design for the study of socio-environmental conflict in digital newspaper sources, Maryhlda Victoria Rivero Corona (IVIC, Ven).

200 NGOs and experts warn against UN plan to protect 30 percent of the planet by 2030

Contributed by Jonathan Mazower, Survival International

The One Planet Summit for biodiversity in Paris last month confirmed the agenda of many governments, and the conservation industry, to push ahead with a plan to place at least 30 percent of the Earth’s surface under conservation status by 2030.

Organized by France in cooperation with the UN and the World Bank, the summit launched the “High Ambition Coalition for Nature and People,” to drive progress towards the “30×30” target. 

But two hundred NGOs and experts have now signed a warning that the drive to increase global protected areas such as national parks could ruin the lives of hundreds of millions of people, and do nothing to preserve biodiversity.

In a letter to the Secretariat of the UN Convention on Biodiversity (CBD), the NGOs warn that as many as 300 million people could be dispossessed unless there are much stronger protections for the rights of indigenous peoples and other land-dependent communities.

Later this year, the Conference of Parties to the CBD is set to agree on the new 30×30 plan. It would double the current protected land area over the coming decade.

Many indigenous representatives, such as Archana Soreng of the Kharia tribe and Pranab Doley of the Mising people, have been campaigning against the 30% target. 

Together with Survival International, the global movement for the rights of tribal peoples, they’ve declared that it will constitute the biggest land grab in world history and reduce hundreds of millions of people to landless poverty. Survival’s campaign calls the plan the #BigGreenLie.

In many parts of the world a Protected Area is where the local people who called the land home for generations are no longer allowed to live or use the natural environment to feed their families, gather medicinal plants or visit their sacred sites. This follows the model of the United States’ nineteenth century creation of the world’s first national parks on lands stolen from Native Americans. Many US national parks forced the peoples who had created the wildlife-rich “wilderness” landscapes into landlessness and poverty.

This is still happening to indigenous peoples and other communities in Africa and parts of Asia. Local people are pushed out by force, coercion or bribery. They are beaten, tortured and abused by park rangers when they try to hunt to feed their families or just to access their ancestral lands. The best guardians of the land, once self-sufficient and with the lowest carbon footprint of any of us, are reduced to landless impoverishment and often end up adding to urban overcrowding.


Around the world, indigenous peoples are increasingly denouncing the conservation industry as a “source of threats and a source of violation of indigenous rights,” and repeatedly speak out against threats to evict them in the name of conservation.

POLLEN January Updates

Dear POLLEN Members and Friends,

We have a packed newsletter to start the year with – lots of new publications, the introduction of the POLLEN Advisory Collective, CfPs, seminar and speaker series, courses, and more. We are also introducing the newly established Levant Node. Enjoy the read!

Best wishes, 

POLLEN Secretariat

NOTE: the updates below are a copy of the original newsletter, and therefore might not contain all hyperlinks and content. To access the original with full content, as well as to see previous newsletters, follow this link: https://us20.campaign-archive.com/home/?u=71814a42a0d2d8f390cbee1be&id=3fe97edf35

Read full newsletter

Ph.D. Course: The political ecology of pandemics

Time and place: Aug. 9, 2021 9:00 AM–Aug. 11, 2021 4:00 PM, Centre for Development and the Environment (SUM), Oslo, Norway

Application deadline: 15th March

The objective of this interdisciplinary course is to critically approach the relationship between food production and food consumption and pandemics in an environmental perspective.

See full description and apply on this link.

POLLEN December Updates

Dear POLLEN Members and Friends,

We closed 2020 and look forward to a different 2021! However, before we do this, here’s a look at what happened across POLLEN in December. We have plenty of publications, some CfPs, podcasts, blog posts and more.

Also, as this is our last newsletter before handing over to our friends at the Australian National University, we would like to take the opportunity to thank you for all your active involvement and contributions that made the work of the Secretariat easier, and most importantly, enjoyable!

Best wishes, 

POLLEN Secretariat

NOTE: the updates below are a copy of the original newsletter, and therefore might not contain all hyperlinks and content. To access the original with full content, as well as to see previous newsletters, follow this link: https://us20.campaign-archive.com/home/?u=71814a42a0d2d8f390cbee1be&id=3fe97edf35

READ FULL NEWSLETTER

Online course: Methodologies to study socio-environmental conflicts in digital sources

Open registrations!

Duration: six weeks, starting February 1, 2021.

Language: Spanish.

Weekly live online lectures. Classes will be recorded and available after each session for all enrollees.

Professors: Marhylda Victoria Rivero Corona and Marx Jose Gomez-Liendo (both are POLLEN members).

The course provides tools to analyze the connections between national and global contexts, identify disputes between different worldviews and valuation languages, reveal actors’ agendas, and analyze socio-environmental conflicts explanation.

Here you can find more information about costs, syllabus, and certification. If you have additional questions, do not hesitate to contact formigas@iberoamericasocial.com

Request for newsletter input

Dear POLLEN friends, 
In the first week of January we will gather together all the updates that happened across the network in December. Due to the holidays we are providing a much longer window for receiving inputs (and will therefore publish the newsletter a little bit later than usual), so please forward any news you have by Tuesday, 5th of January to politicalecologynetwork@gmail.com  
Best wishes, 
POLLEN Secretariat

International Symposium – Stories from a Post-growth Future

15th RIHN International Symposium: “Transitioning Cultures of Everyday Food Consumption and Production: Stories from a Post-growth Future.

Date: Wednesday, January 13th, 2021 – Saturday, 16th, 2021 

Language: English(Simultaneous translation to Japanese is available.) 

Pre-Registration: Register from here: https://forms.gle/VPfVVobMRcT7nCrs9 

Website: https://www.chikyu.ac.jp/rihn_e/events/symposiums/no15.html 

Venue: Online(Zoom, Slack) 

see more info